Search results for: print fabric.

Sunbonnet for log cabin ladies: Go here: http://www.uvm.edu/~hag/godey/fashion/di.html and scroll down to the "September, 1857: Sun-Bonnet" entry. If you click on the images, you will get larger ones. The pattern gives you both full pattern pieces and half pattern pieces (for placing on folds, presumably), and that's a total of six pieces. Only use the three full pieces. You will have to use the illustration of the finished bonnet as a guide for putting it together, as there are rather cryptic instructions, really meant for making a full-size bonnet in 1857, given at the bottom. To scale the pattern page down appropriately, the image print size should be about 2" wide by 3" high. You can do this in MS Word (by importing the image and scaling it to those proportions) or any image editor (by setting the print size). I would do a paper mockup first, and then use heavy paper to reinforce the front of the bonnet when I made it (instead of the cording, unless you want to be very, very precise!). Alternately, instead of paper, use heavyweight stitch witch to bond the outer and lining fabric together for the front, as that will stiffen it enough that it will hold its shape and not ravel. The crown and cape need to be gathered slightly to fit, which can be done while you are gluing if you are using a quick-drying fabric glue. I'd actually cut the cape a bit fuller than is shown so that it can be draped a bit more prettily, but I don't know how utilitarian your ladies are! :) I really love this page for its patterns. I've used them for dolls and some for full-size costume reproductions as well

Maura Bass


Right now, my local True Value hardware store is selling Stanley Cup keychains. The Red Wings have a sales catalog, so I got on the mailing list. The catalog provided me with team photos and other photos I could use. Here are items I was able to make or buy: The catalog had pictures of post cards. I scanned the post cards and resized them. Then I saved the scan and cut and pasted it several times into my word program. This gave me a page full of postcards to use. I made a makeshift post card holder out of plastic, but you could probably do something better.

I traced a large Red Wing logo onto shrink plastic and baked it. I then set it inside a plastic report cover end piece and had an art object.
A smaller logo was shrink plastisized into a doorknob. Stanley Cup champion t-shirts were sold all over the place with a shiny round holographic sticker on them. I used that on the front door for a sign.

I had bought a roll of Red Wings gift wrap. I took a photo of it, scanned it, and then printed a bunch to roll into mini gift wrap. I rolled the paper over a toothpick and when done, pulled the toothpick out.

A picture of the original Red Wings arena was cut out of the catalog and glued onto a Formica sample from Home Depot. It made an impressive poster.

A large honey container became my TV. I painted it glossy black and then inserted a photo (I had taken pictures of my tv when the Championship parade was on.) I inserted the photo into the hollow of the container. There was enough edge to glue on 4 black beads for knobs.
- A shoe lace became my Red Wings border around the top of the shop.
- Two hockey player keychains became figures on the top of a shelf. I just removed the keychain part.
- A lapel pin became a sign.
- A championship ring that was sold at Little Caesar's became a shelf ornament.
- Another key chain became another sign.
- A picture in the sales catalog of a puck and player photo became a display. I cut out the tiny photo and the picture of the tiny puck and glued them onto a piece of clear plastic and bent back the bottom a bit for the stand.
- I took photos of the various magazines I could find with the Red Wings on them. When developed, I carefully cut them out and glued them around a piece of matboard. Gave me lots of mini hockey magazines to place around.
- Hockey sticks: I was able to cut out small hockey sticks from the catalog and glue them to posterboard. Colored the posterboard as needed and I had the little souvenir hockey sticks.
- Newspaper: I took photos of the newspapers that had the Championship all over them. These I printed on an off-white paper and then bundled them together with extra paper to make a "full" newspaper.
- Dustpan: (for the sweep!) bought a mini red dustpan and just glued a tiny logo on it.
- Waste Cans: Used small ovals of some sort and glued logos on the sides.
- T-shirts: Cut squares of red fabric and glued them to look like folded t-shirts for the shelf. The top one has a logo glued on.
- Hangers: took mini wooden hangers, painted them white, and added a tiny logo
- Found a hockey goalie mask charm to hang on the shelf.
- Used red pots and pans from the mini store and glued tiny logos on.
- I had window decals that I took pictures of the full sheet and then cut them out and blue tacked them one on top of the other on the wall to look like a bunch on a rack. I couldn't get anything to work at the time as a "hook" so I had to improvise.
- Also took pictures I could get of notepads, stickers, keychains, bumper stickers, etc and then reproduced them in scale to give the feeling of fullness and lots of souvenirs.
- I had pictures of posters to make glossy posters.
- I used red buttons to make clocks with the logos and clock faces cut from the sales catalog.
- I found a calendar on the net that showed the current months Red Wings schedule. I just saved and reproduced it.
- I also took pictures of tiny cupcake picks. These I was able to glue to a small piece of tin (from a lid of some sort) and I had a bunch of mini magnets.
- I painted a wooden train red and white and added a logo for the Red Wings train.
- I took white flocked bears (in abundance at craft stores) and added a logo to their stomach.
- I also found a kid-sized plush hockey puck to make into a "chair" in the shop.
- I painted the floor to look like a hockey rink.

Carolyn in MI


Mini scenes as gifts: I had the brainwave that I could use the left-over gift bag room from my elder's party in January and make a classroom scene from printables. My daughters identified the important elements of the classroom and then we set out to find them on the web. I think we found everything from just 4 sites, Jim's printables at http://www.printmini.com, Eileen's printables at http://members.home.net/eileenmorgan/printables.html, http://miniatures.About.com and a site I only just found with a huge range of stuff, Boop Mini Printables at http://www.geocities.com/boopmini40/

I used a table from the dollar store and painted it the right colours, backed a clock face of Jim's with a button of the right shape and colour, made a flag from a fabric cutout and a fancy toothpick, mitred a window frame from balsa, made coloured pencils from 1/2" nails with the heads cut off and painted, and everything else was paper. ...found a printable stone floor that looked pretty realistic behind the window frame! Boop Mini's had the critical snack food containers and bookcases, somewhere else had the ubiquitous tissue box, to which we added a real bit of tissue, Jim's TV, computer and dictionary (exactly the right one!) were perfect. We also found manila files and envelopes, graph paper, tiny word puzzles, books (including a Dr Seuss with inside pages), 12" and 36" rulers, a file box, maps and posters. Paper sample books rescued a while back from the garbage provided construction paper and even a blue rug. Finally, my daughters painted and drew miniature artwork for the classroom walls.


Vegetable Room: Why not use a dried gourd as a room for your fruits and veggies? Or a paper mache pumpkin or tea pot? Or you could make a watermelon shaped room out of paper mache over a balloon to get the shape. Or just go with a plain old foam core room box covered with fabric in a fruit or veggie print.

I have 3 gourds I'm going to use my 'virgin' Dremel on! I received lots of encouragement from everyone. So Thank You Very Much! I figure if I mess up too bad I can always make birdhouses out of them!

Pam in St. Louis


Boop Mini Printables at http://www.geocities.com/boopmini40/

I used a table from the dollar store and painted it the right colours, backed a clock face of Jim's with a button of the right shape and colour, made a flag from a fabric cutout and a fancy toothpick, mitred a window frame from balsa, made coloured pencils from 1/2" nails with the heads cut off and painted, and everything else was paper. We even found a printable stone floor that looked pretty realistic behind the window frame! Boop Mini's had the critical snack food containers and bookcases, somewhere else had the ubiquitous tissue box, to which we added a real bit of tissue, Jim's TV, computer and dictionary (exactly the right one!) were perfect. We also found manila files and envelopes, graph paper, tiny word puzzles, books (including a Dr Seuss with inside pages), 12" and 36" rulers, a file box, maps and posters. Paper sample books rescued a while back from the garbage provided construction paper and even a blue rug. Finally, my daughters painted and drew miniature artwork for the classroom walls.

Wendy in Clinton, NJ


How to Print on Fabric Using Your Inkjet Printer Using Freezer Paper: With this method, you will actually print directly onto the fabric, rather than transferring. Cut a piece of fabric the size of a regular piece of paper (8 1/2 X 11). Cut a piece of freezer paper the same size. Press the wrong side of the fabric to the shiny side of the freezer paper, using an iron set to medium heat. Press just enough to melt the wax on the paper, and fuse the fabric to it--- the whole thing will become slightly stiff. Trim if necessary, so that there are no fabric edges hanging over the paper. Put the fused piece into the printer tray with the fabric side facing the proper direction for the printer to print directly onto the fabric. Be sure the sheet is in straight, and that there is regular printer paper beneath it in the printer tray.

You may want to experiment with your printer settings. If available, try special paper or transparency settings. Try setting to highest quality print and darkest print level. If your printer allows for extra drying time, try this as well. Each printer is different, so once you get some settings that work for you, write them down.

Once you have your settings ready to go, print the image onto the fabric. Once the sheet goes through, it's best to handle the piece as little as possible until it is really dry. Set it aside for a while, or use a blow dryer.

This method can be a little tricky, but yields a very nice result, with good color quality. The down side is that the finished piece will not be washable. I've heard there is a product out there that will set the ink, making it permanent, but I haven't tried or found it yet.

Terri


Ivy: Many ways to make ivy. In one of Andrea Barham's books, she recommends drying a few inches at the tips of real ivy clipped while the leaves are still tiny. I have used wonder-under to fuse a light green solid fabric to a tiny ivy print (so the underside of the leaves are colored), then snipped individual leaves with sharp scissors and glued them to loops along a length of covered wire. I have also used a weed that should be shooting up about now in the US. Dried whole, the seed branches make good mini poplar trees, but if you don't dry it first, just drape and glue it while still green. It makes a nice full vine and holds its color pretty well. Don't know the name; it "ripens" to a bright rust color and grows along roadsides everywhere in Ohio. Many people drag a length of string through tacky glue and then through shredded green Oasis or railroad ground cover. Others buy garlands of tiny leaves at the craft store and use the smallest. Experiment with what works best for you!


Ivy: Many ways to make ivy. In one of Andrea Barham's books, she recommends drying a few inches at the tips of real ivy clipped while the leaves are still tiny. I have used wonder-under to fuse a light green solid fabric to a tiny ivy print (so the underside of the leaves are colored), then snipped individual leaves with sharp scissors and glued them to loops along a length of covered wire. I have also used a weed that should be shooting up about now in the US. Dried whole, the seed branches make good mini poplar trees, but if you don't dry it first, just drape and glue it while still green. It makes a nice full vine and holds its color pretty well. Don't know the name; it "ripens" to a bright rust color and grows along roadsides everywhere in Ohio. Many people drag a length of string through tacky glue and then through shredded green Oasis or railroad ground cover. Others buy garlands of tiny leaves at the craft store and use the smallest. Experiment with what works best for you!

Loretta Sniarowski


Finishing

Inexpensive wallpaper: Saw the note about wallpaper/paint for finishing rooms and a   response saying most people wallpaper which is true.   Also said wallpaper really isn't expensive which is debatable depending on the state of your pocketbook! :)   At $2.50 per sheet retail and assuming you use three sheets per room so you don't have to do any piecing, that can add up if you're doing a house with 6 or 8 rooms.   Anyway, I just wanted to suggest that you think about very tiny print "real" wallpaper that you can buy closeouts on usually for $1.00 per roll.   But even better (cause you don't end up with 6 or 8 huge rolls of wallpaper when you're done) is looking at fabrics as wall coverings.   The colors, prints, etc., are limitless and it is very inexpensive to use.   If you your rooms have 8" high walls, you can buy a quarter of a yard (9") of a 36" or 44" wide fabric and have enough to do the entire room for just a dollar or two depending on the fabric you select.   When I paper with fabric, I use double sided carpet tape on poster board panels and then glue the panels to the walls but there are various other methods also.

Mary Lynne in Huntington, WV


Fans: it's probably out of print but look for a projects pamphlet Joann Swanson did back in the Nutshell era -- it's a miscellaneous compilation that includes fans (sorry am at work so can't look up title), gardening products, Victorian scrap art and Valentines, kites, etc. There's a set of fan templates to copy and hand-color. Directions call for using cut-down flat-sided toothpicks as the blades glued to the folds of the paper fan. To make a working fan a tiny hole was to be drilled in the narrow ends of the picks (don't think I could do it!) to thread them onto a fine but strong wire fastener. Otherwise, directions were to glue the fan in open position with the narrow ends of the picks stacked on top of one another. Once assembled, accessorize with a tassel hanging from the handle and/or lace or feather trim on the fan.

An easier alternative would be the paddle-type fans popular in old-time churches in the summer (Scripture quotes and Biblical illustration on one side, funeral home ad on the other) and also sometimes found in purely decorative secular styles. Use some clipart or fabric the right size and shape for the paddle, cut a matching backing of coordinated fabric or paper, and glue together with a turned toothpick handle sandwiched in between.

Or make a similar "palm leaf" fan - -- same general principle and turned handle, with a fan-palm frond paddle cut from tan silk-flower foliage.

Loretta


Wallpaper in America: Itsy Bitsy Minis sells some nice prints, and they have matching fabric too. They do ship internationally too. I just checked. http://www.itsybitsymini.com/index.htm

Kassy, Bristol, CT


MiniQult: YOU DON"T HAVE TO SEW! In the world of mini's, you can glue it! Just cut out that fabric with the tiny, tiny squares on it, on any really tiny print to the size you want, plus 1/4 inch, then press the edges under that 1/4, (make two sides the same or different). Cut a piece of flannel, or fleece or any other soft fabric about 1/8" smaller than outside fabrics. Make a sandwich with the fleece in-between the 2 outside fabrics with the right side of the fabrics facing outside (* that makes sense *) Put fabric glue on the turned under fabric. this will close the sandwich together. If you can you might want to take occasional in-out stitch with floss or even regular thread just to make a knot. Leave the knot with about a 1/8" "tail". You can make these knots across the quilt wherever you want and it will make the quilt puffy, or just leave as is. I find that if you press the edges so that it hangs down on the sides, you can have it hang nicely. The lighter weight the fabric is, the better it will drape. A "handkerchief" batiste, for example,, hangs better than one of the cheaper fabrics that have a lot of sizing in it. I also, find that if you wash your fabric first before you work with it at all, it removes all that sizing that stiffens the fabric and then afterwards if you need to stiffen it at all, you can just use fabric sizing or starch to make it smooth. If you want it to permanently be set on a bed. just a bit of glue underneath will hold it down. I hate to see quilts sticking out like a board from the bed, so sometimes I use a bit of tacky gum to hold them down too. good luck.

Ruthanne in sunny, hot, (86), FT.MYERS, FL


Quilt Shop Room Box: Check any local museum shops or stationery shops for fancy gift wraps. I once found some in a Baltimore album quilt pattern that I used over time for several "wallpaper borders" in country and Victorian rooms.Look in fabric shops' button sections for mini scissors; cut tiny circles of green felt with pinking shears and glue to red pompoms for pincushions; ink lines on flat wood coffee stirrers for yardsticks; snip off turned tops of decorative toothpicks for spools. Sometimes the quilting fabric sections have mini-quilt print patterns -- I bought a yard a few years ago and am just running out. Very easy quilts -- just stitch together with felt batting and backing, turn, stitch closed, and either machine stitch or hand-stitch along the printed design. (For me, real batting is too puffy to drape over a mini-bed or display over a quilt rack or folded in a cabinet.)

Loretta.Sniarowski


Paper to Fabric Trick:
- First step is to get the design into your computer: scan or photograph with a digital camera.
- Second step is to clean up the design: use a program like paintshop.
- Third: print it on your computer using fabric paper from a quilt shop, I understand Walmart carries this also.
- Fourth: spray fabric with a fixative for stablizing ink...do this OUTSIDE and leave it there to air.
- Fifth: ready to use.

Laurie Sisson


Mini Needlework/Fabric Shop: I have one in progress, almost finished except for all the really little details.  I made the usual fabric bolts until I realized that I could use mini wall paper wrapped around a bolt also.  I cut out pictures from the huge 800 page catalog of the wall paper samples and wrapped them around my bolt.   I make my bolts by folding index cards to size.   As the bolts are in a shelving unit it doesn't matter if the "fabric" wraps all the way around.   So I have tons of fabric bolts in lots of colors.

I made regular bolts of ribbon also.  But them I decided to make mini printed   ribbon on my computer.  I used clip art to make a line of little pumpkins and it worked.  I've made all kinds of printed ribbon.  The ribbon rack is an inexpensive hutch from the craft store.  I took off the doors, stained it with brown shoe polish, cut white cocktail straws to fit the shelves and wrapped the ribbons around the straws.   They fit right in the shelves (across).   I also did some solid colored ribbon with my computer.

I am using cuts outs from magazines for sewing and needle work books.   The book of the month type ads have just the right size.  I am also using catalog pictures downsized for the sewing notion packages. I also wrapped cocktail straws with fabric cut 4 1/2 inches wide to be the decorator fabric.   I made racks to hang on the wall.   I cut 2 strips of 1/4" wide x 1/8" wood to fit vertically on the wall.  I put in little eye screws evenly spaced in each and fit the "bolts" in the eye bolts.

Since I have two front windows and a glass door, I made signs on my computer with all the shop information:  name, proprietor, hours, etc.  I am going to print it out to fit the appropriate windows on over head transparency film made for ink jet printers.

I also made two large tables using little wooden spools found at the craft stores for the legs.   It seemed appropriate for a fabric store.   I made notion stands using the spools and wooden wheels.  I used large needle to make the holes to put wire in to hold the notions. I'm thinking about scanning real lace and reducing the pictures, though I do have some mini lace.  I am going to use dowels for thread, but I am not making individual spools.  I am going to build a rack similar to the ones in real fabric stores and fit the dowels across.   I am going to use paint pens to color them for the thread.

Lee Ann


Freezer wrap: What I want to do with it.

1. I want to use it as a backing for thin fabric so I can print on it.

2. I would like to use it as a backing for  printed tissue paper and paper napkins ( the printed layer only) so I can    use it   for my greeting card and envelope making. I do not take  the freezer paper away but I leave it on for these projects.   For the cards I cut this paper into pieces and use it in card blanks. Ican also make 12thscale cards this way.

3. I want to use tissue  permanently backed with freezer paper to fold tiny gift bags and boxes for my dollshouses.

4. I would like to use it for some quilting projects. Perhaps even minis?!

5. Finally I would love to experiment with white tissue backed with freezer paper and   run it through my printer to see if I can print my own paper to use for the things mentioned under 2 and 3

Marianne


Unusual printies site has "How To's":  a nice woman named Barbara Del Duco sent me her site. It's different than some I've seen, because it has a lot of "How To's" for assembling the printies into different things (dresses, top hats, curtains, box kites)  They have a really neat looking 1940's kitchen set. I imagined printing it out to fabric, and giving it a coat of mod podge, duplicating it to look like an old fashioned oilcloth! She's got mini directions, printies for a picnic hamper, too, but my favorite   was her printie diner menus. I've never seen them before. Check it out  http://www.printies.homestead.com

Sherise


What I've done with pretty papers that I wanted to use for upholstery fabric on chairs and such is to scan the paper and then in whatever software you have to use, size it if it needs to be to a smaller scale, and then print it onto the transfer paper that is used for photo transfers (to fabric) like tee shirts and quilts. That paper is available in many stores - WalMart, Best Buy, Office Depot and others. This not at all hard to do. The one trick I learned over the years is to use a ceramic tile (you can go to a tile shop and buy just one tile - if you do this get a large one and make sure it has a smooth surface) and NOT an ironing board for the pressing surface. Also be sure to follow the mfgs instructions for time and heat setting. Another trick is when you put the transfer down onto the fabric, fold back a tiny part of one corner - this will give you a "handle" to hold on to when you peel back the paper. Then when you are ready to peel the paper off the fabric, just peel back a little bit to make sure the transfer really "took". If it didn't just smooth the transfer paper back and press more. If you just yank the transfer paper off, and the image hasn't transferred evenly, or completely it is nearly impossible to get the transfer paper back in proper place. Some fabrics take to this better than others and generally speaking, the natural fibers work best; like cotton, linen, silk and such. When using a light colored fabric or a delicate fabric it is a good idea to use a press cloth so you won't scorch your fabric and good old parchment paper works great for that. If you have any questions on this, please email me and will be glad to try to help if you want to try this.

Ronni


Cork Crafts: Slicing, painting or spackling to make special-occasion cakes. Also, a classic homecraft dollhouse use is seating (proportions are closer to 1:24 or child-size 1:12). Slice the cork in half lengthwise for 2 settees, or in 4 horizontal rounds for chairs. Glue fabric over the top for a cushion. Stick corsage pins along the top of one side for backrest slats. Stick four into the bottom for legs. Wrap and glue heavy cotton thread around the legs. Then weave the thread back and forth among the back slats for the backrest, tying or gluing ends to finish. Works best with an uneven number of pins (5, not 4). Results: child-size "wicker."

Using a horizontal slice, stick in leg pins and round-headed straight pins all around the side edges. Weave the thread as for a chair, and you have a table. These were probably the very first miniatures I ever made, over 40 years ago as a Brownie Scout! Wish I still had them; crude, but made a kid feel pretty crafty! Better directions and illustrations in Audrey Johnson's book Furnishing Dolls Houses (see library, it's out of print.).If you have a really good cutting tool that can slice evenly, you could probably make your own cork tiles from lengthwise slices cut into squares; ditto for corkboards, frame the slices in scrap wood.

For a mini-fisherman, carve tiny balls, add toothpick ends, and paint red and white for a bobber that will really float.

Slice and then cut sole-shaped pieces, use sequin pins and glue to attach ribbon uppers for platform sandals.

Loretta Sniarowski


Brass Stair Rods: I've been meaning to add the directions for making the rods to my web site. I do give out printed instructions along with any stair runners I sell. For the rods, I recommend using 1/16" K&S brass rod, available at some hardware stores, many art supply stores and most model train/hobby supply stores, for about 30¢ for a 12" piece. Cut the rod to a length about 1/4" longer than the width of your stair runner. Then buy a spool of 28 ga. brass wire, about a dollar (US). When you unhook the wire from the spool, it will uncoil itself for a dozen turns or so. Gently pull those up above the spool, and holding the loops together, cut at 12 o'clock and 6 o'clock, this will give you 24 or so lengths of wire cut to about 1-1/2". Use one of your brass rods to form the screw eyes to hold the rods in place. Fold the cut wire into a U, then cross the arms of the U snugly around the rod and hold the cut ends in one hand, while turning the rod with the other. After you've twisted 1/2" beyond the rod, trim off the V of the two ends, and you have a nice little screw eye.

You'll need to drill a small hole in the stair tread, right alongside the edge of your runner, near the riser, on each side. The screw eye will actually "screw" down into the hole if you've got the right drill bit, or a drop of super glue holds the screw eye in place, with just the eye sitting above the stair tread. Make a casing at the top end of your runner (sew or glue under about a 1/4" with Designer Tacky so it doesn't bleed through). Slide a brass rod into the casing, then into the screw eyes on the top step. Work your way down the staircase, putting the rods on top of the runner, then through the eyes. At the bottom, it's your call as to whether the runner ends at the floor, or just under the bottom tread's lip (real houses have either). Mark where the bottom casing should be, then trim to the proper length, make a casing and slide the last rod in. Note that you'll need one more rod than you have stair steps.

I've found that in miniature it's not really necessary to put the end caps on the rods. At that scale, it's neat enough to have the rods, no one seems to miss the fancy ends. To make fabric fuzzy or napped, you can also use sandpaper. Glue 120 grit sandpaper to a wood block (a small 2" square chunk will do), then use it to 'rough up' whatever fabric you find for your runner. (I put it on my thigh to sand, dangerous in shorts weather!) If you can't find a ribbon you like, iron on the thinnest iron-on interfacing you can find (it comes in black, too, for dark colored runners) to a piece of uncut corduroy or other fabric and then trim to the width you want. The interfacing will control raveling on the edges. If you can, cut the runner with a rotary cutter, (a quilter's tool, like a pizza cutter) to get the edges perfectly straight. Sandpaper is how I get the Hudson Bay blankets to look like wool, even though they're rayon (don't tell!) http://weevings.com/Hudson_Bay_white.jpg

Bonni in NH


Search found 112 tip(s) of 10312 tips in the archives.

Previous 20 | Next 20


Page 1 of 6.



Search for:


Browse the database (all entries)