Cameras and Photography

Page: 2

Scanner: I have an HP ScanJet at home; however, I removed it as Adobe would cause Windows 98 to freeze intermittently. I put my pictures on my web page and/or PhotoPoint by:

a) my digital camera

- or-

b) have my pictures developed on a disc. Makes it so easy to call them up.

When I really need something scanned I use the one at work.

Marsha, Newark, CA


Scanner: I recently bought an HP scanner and it came with software and instructions. Get out your scanners, hook them up, install the software, and just go to town! The best teacher is experience, and YOU can do this! I used to be more intimidated by technology, then it occurred to me.... what's the worst thing that can happen? Don't worry about your things being perfect on your first try... experiment. Most scanners come with some sort of imaging package for trimming, improving the picture quality, saving to your hard drive, etc. Just play around a little until you start to get the hang of how it works. I started with pics of my kids...before long, I had gotten the hang of the darn thing.

Sloan


Scanner: For an excellent scanning tutorial go to:

http://www.scantips.com/

Barbara B.


WalMart Photo Site: I just stumbled onto this, and many of you might already know, so bear with me. I love photography, my Minor in college. So, I take lots of pictures, and used to develop my own. Lately I started with WalMart, and thought I'd try the CD download...But, because the rolls were stacking up, just had them developed into prints. WalMart inserted a card, "Share your world", with the roll #, claim#, etc. So I went to the site, and there are my pictures! I could email, crop, zoom, and yes...have an album to share. I haven't fully checked into the in's and out's but the opportunity is there for us photo site newbies. I'm not sure it has all the bell's & whistle's of all the beautiful sites posted here on SS, but it can be a start. And for those that do not have a scanner/digital camera, this just might be the ticket. There is a price. I think it is $1.48/year. So take a peek.

Rita-Montana


CLOSE UP PHOTOGRAPHY: READ THIS ONLY IF YOU WANT TO SAVE SOME MONEY. READ THIS ONLY IF YOU WANT CLOSE UP PHOTOGRAPHS OF YOUR WORK. DO NOT READ THIS IF YOU HAVE MONEY TO SPARE. If you got this far you are interested. I have found that I can take photos as close as 2" from my subject using my "el cheapo" Olympus digital camera. All that is needed is; The camera. A good hefty rubber band. At lease one magnifying glass. A few of varying magnifications may come in handy. Not required but will save some time is the soft ware that allows you to control the camera from the PC as my Olympus software does. The advantage of this is that it displays what the camera sees about every 15 seconds so you can tell if you have a shot you want or not.

PROCEDURE:
Slip the rubber band over the camera so that it will hold the magnifying glass over the lens of the camera. This permits you to have both hands free. Move the camera (with the magnifying glass over the lens) either in closer or move the camera away from the object until you have the composed shot that you want. This will be displayed on the monitor of the PC. My Olympus soft ware permits me to zoom in or out on the photo taken. The zoom in feature increases the magnification without losing the clarity of the shot. That is all that is involved. You can "fool" around with varying magnifying lenses and take it from here. Sure beats buying close-up lenses for that expensive film camera. Let me know how things work out and if you need any further assistance. If SS permitted photos I would include them. Just take my word for it. The chances are you can download the cameras soft ware for nothing from the web site of the camera manufacturer.

DrBob


Camera/Software: We have a Sony Cybershot 70 which takes wonderful photos. We use Picture It - a very simple program - to "tweak" our photos. The Cybershot uses very tiny "memory sticks" on which you can get many, many photos and use the camera inside and out.

Georgina H. Simmons


Cameras: For the best cost-value camera, I vote for the Sony Mavica. There are several models of varying prices, starting at about $300. The resolution is approx. 360x720. The cameras run on regular computer floppy disks, so media is quite inexpensive. You just take the photos (one floppy holds about 24 pictures) and then put the disk in your camera. I purchased one in 1996 and have taken about 3000 photos since then. The one drawback is the camera is a bit large and boxy because it has to accommodate the disk drive. For the top of the line camera, I like for the Canon G1 with the 1GB IBM micro drive. It's around $1400, but it is a 3.3 mega pixel camera which produces film-quality photos. The micro drive will hold several hundred photos which can be downloaded directly to your computer, so you can take it anywhere and not worry about running out of film. This camera is small - the size of a regular pocket camera. This one is on my wish list =) As far as editing options, it depends on how much time you want to spend...but ArcSoft PhotoStudio is an inexpensive option. The Microsoft Photo Editor included with OfficePro is not too bad either.

Whui


Imaging Software: about photo software for your computer, you may already have one for free if you use Windows 98 or maybe even WIN 95. In your accessories file is a program called IMAGING. Although I have many other imaging software, I used it to download my pictures from my digital camera. It has most of the common features found in other photo software. If you are using your pictures only for computer viewing or email you don't need to fine tune your pictures unless you need a nice photo print or intend to publish them. In the same vein, I purchased a digital camera from AOL called the Chameleon and made by LARGAN. It cost about $130 but only has a resolution of 640X480 (the resolution of most computer screens). Again it is only good for pictures on a computer or sending email. However, because of its low resolution it can store up to 128 pictures. It should be great to take on long trips where you have no access to a computer to download and you won't have to bother with other storage media. It's only a few inches square so fits in your shirt pocket. The only problem is that it's so small I've already misplaced it. I'm hoping that by saying all these nice things about it, that it will turn up.

Harriett


Camera/Software: Most cameras come with some sort of software. Mine came with EZ photo which is all you need for cropping, sizing, brightness and contrast adjustment. It's a very easy to use program. I also have Corel but use EZ photos for quick, simple adjustments. My camera is almost 3 years old so I don't feel qualified to give advice on the new cameras. I will say that I have been happy with my Olympus. I've had no problems with it and it has been used quite a lot.

Carol


Camera/Software: I found Adobe's PhotoDeluxe 2.0 on my machine, there is a much later version now. It is simple enough for an idiot like me who had never used such software, with simple on screen prompts as to what to do next, but it trims, crops, color corrects, lots of stuff. I use it for every photo that I put on eBay (toy trains, so they are small like minis), and it is really easy and rather inexpensive. My camera is a Sony Mavica 91. I love it when I am using it, it stores pix on floppies, of which I had hundreds. However, at high resolution I only get 12-14 pix per floppy, so I usually carry about 24 with me. However, last July and again last month it refused to turn on. It cost me $90 repairs the first time and $165 this time, and they will not even tell me what was wrong (it went to Sony here locally). I would look at an Olympus next time, I think.

Barb Jones


Camera/Software: We have a Sony Cybershot 70 which takes wonderful photos. We use Picture It - a very very simple program - to "tweak" our photos. The Cybershot uses very tiny "memory sticks" on which you can get many, many photos and use the camera inside and out.

Georgina H. Simmons-Gagnon


Cameras: For the best cost-value camera, I vote for the Sony Mavica. There are several models of varying prices, starting at about $300. The resolution is approx. 360x720. The cameras run on regular computer floppy disks, so media is quite inexpensive. You just take the photos (one floppy holds about 24 pictures) and then put the disk in your camera. I purchased one in 1996 and have taken about 3000 photos since then. The one drawback is the camera is a bit large and boxy because it has to accommodate the disk drive. For the top of the line camera, I like for the Canon G1 with the 1GB IBM micro drive. It's around $1400, but it is a 3.3 mega pixel camera which produces film-quality photos. The micro drive will hold several hundred photos that can be downloaded directly to your computer, so you can take it anywhere and not worry about running out of film. This camera is small - the size of a regular pocket camera. This one is on my wish list =) As far as editing options, it depends on how much time you want to spend...but ArcSoft PhotoStudio is an inexpensive option. The Microsoft Photo Editor included with OfficePro is not too bad either.

Whui in SF


Imaging Software: about photo software for your computer, you may already have one for free if you use Windows 98 or maybe even WIN 95. In your accessories file is a program called IMAGING. Although I have many other imaging software, I used it to download my pictures from my digital camera. It has most of the common features found in other photo software. If you are using your pictures only for computer viewing or email you don't need to fine tune your pictures unless you need a nice photo print or intend to publish them. In the same vein, I purchased a digital camera from AOL called the Chameleon and made by LARGAN. It cost about $130 but only has a resolution of 640X480 (the resolution of most computer screens). Again it is only good for pictures on a computer or sending email. However, because of its low resolution it can store up to 128 pictures. It should be great to take on long trips where you have no access to a computer to download and you won't have to bother with other storage media. It's only a few inches square so fits in your shirt pocket. The only problem is that it's so small I've already misplaced it. I'm hoping that by saying all these nice things about it, that it will turn up.

Harriett- Framingham, MA


Photography/ring light: I have a ring light that fits the 55mm macro lens that I use for orchid photography close-ups. The advantage of the ring light is it doesn't cast any shadows since the whole ring completely surrounding the lens lights up evenly. The disadvantage is that it's only good for close-ups. Unless you plan on doing a LOT of close-up work, it's probably not worth the expense.

Rose from MA


Camera/Software: Most cameras come with some sort of software. Mine came with EZ photo which is all you need for cropping, sizing, brightness and contrast adjustment. It's a very easy to use program. I also have Corel but use EZ photos for quick, simple adjustments. My camera is almost 3 years old so I don't feel qualified to give advice on the new cameras. I will say that I have been happy with my Olympus. I've had no problems with it and it has been used quite a lot.

Carol


Record Keeping: Another option to using video tape for record keeping would be to use a digital video camera to record, and transfer the video to a CD using your computer. Then you can make extra backup copies in minutes for the price of a blank CD. CDs don't degrade over time, but would be vulnerable to fire. Digital copying would have almost no loss of quality between "generations." I scanned all our family photo albums to the computer, transferred them on CDs, and put store the CDs in a separate location, so in case of fire, we won't lose all our pictures.

Whui in San Francisco


"Lift Off" transfers photos: I have a bottle of a product from Bond Adhesives Company called "LIFT OFF Transfer Medium". It says that it "transfers photos and prints to any surface such as wood, glass, metal,canvas, ceramics, etc.". I bought it a long time ago and have never actually tried it. I can't tell what store I bought it in, but they used hot orange price stickers. It came in a 4 fl oz bottle.

Debbie Olsen


If you feel you should show scale, I'd love to see you use something more creative than a ruler or a coin -- everyone does that. How about draping a Hudson Bay mini blanket over a folded "human sized one"? I love seeing miniatures placed next to their full-sized counterparts in photos - there's nothing more dramatic!

Bev Gallerani


Printer: For those of you who may be interested in purchasing a color printer - Epson will be coming out with a new printer next week, model 1270, under $500. It has new inks and papers that will produce photographs that last for 26 years or more. It is impossible to tell the difference between this print and one done in silver at a photo lab. Right now ink jet printers have a picture life of 1 year in a well-lighted room.

Gail


Photo supplies: Those of us in the photography industry use B & H for supplies because of their prices. I have absolutely no affiliation with this company (besides the excesses of money I pay them for equipment and supplies!) however, I suggest before making any purchases you check with them on their prices, you may find that you save significant money. They have a huge mail
order department. http://www.bhphotovideo.com/

Gail


This category has 101 tips of 10312 tips in the archives.

Previous 20 | Next 20


Page 2 of 6.



Search for:


Browse the database (all entries)