Architectural Details

Page: 3

Thatch roof: Here in England thatching, although an ancient craft, is still practised. My great grandfather was a thatcher near Oxford. The method is this; armfull size bundles of straw are gathered together and tied with a straw twine. These are then placed on the batons of the roof and held in place with a wooden peg. A whole layer was done like this. Then the second overlapped the first, the same as a tiled roof. In some counties, thatchers have their own "signature" of an animal or shape modelled from the straw and the roof.

Tudor houses often had thatched roofs, but you must remember that the more affluent owner would have been able to afford a peg tiled roof. A mini thatched roof could be made from raffia or bristle, or even a scim of finishing plaster with the thatch indents made in it. I hope this is a help to you.

Liz Taylor


1/24th Components: you can find 1/24 scale windows and doors and other architectural components at Grandt Line Products at http://www.mria.org/companies/grandt.html They are in Concord, CA at 1040 B Shary Ct., 94518. Their phone number is 925-671-0143.

- Grandt Line also has such things in 1/4" scale and HO scale.

Barb Jones, Cupertino CA


1/24th Components: Try http://www.halfscaleminis.com they have just about anything halfscale (24th) you might want, and if not on the website email Kathy Thomas (the owner) and she is sure to be able to help you. Also, you can get bricks from http://www.grandadstoys.co.uk and then http://www.richardstacey.com

Marja Lewthwaite


Farmhouse fireplace - these were often made from the big rocks taken out of the fields while plowing so I would say - use real stones! I've tried this and love the results but the finished piece is heavy so I wouldn't place it on a second floor - lol! We made a simple wood fireplace, glued on real rocks from the driveway, let them dry then filled in the seams with dry Waller’s mud. When that dried, we gray washed it to look like cement (acrylic gray & water to thin) and glued a wooden mantel on the top. When gluing on the rocks, you'll want to be sure they are flush with the top (so the mantel sits level) and the back (so it sits against your wall). We left the inside of the hearth plain wood and painted it black, placed some sticks for logs on the bottom then used a painted square of window screen as the fireplace screen.

Lauriel of Belara Beach Original Miniatures


Farmhouse fireplace: I think a fieldstone fireplace would look appropriate. I have been collecting pebbles around the yard for one of these and plan to adhere them with lightweight joint compound. Does this sound feasible or is there a better method?

Maria


San Franciscan Turret: I'm making a Duracraft San Francisco kit. The girl's room is the whole third floor. When I got to making the turret, I didn't cut it the inside walls. Instead I added another wall piece to the middle inside wall section of the turret, and used some of the scrap wood to make an entrance way. The piece I used was around where you punch out the upper most window which is shaped in a oval. So it is a private little room, most of which can only been seen from looking in the windows. Alex, the girl who lives in this room, was annoyed with her aunt for wall papering the room with flowered paper and painting it pink. In return she painted the turret inside walls with vines and flowers. the ceiling is a piece of sky patterned computer printing paper.

Inside the turret, under the roof, at the top it is painting black with star stickers stuck on. You can see inside the turret by opening one of the roofing flaps. That's where the Borrowers live. I was rather pleased with myself for thinking that. The Borrowers also live in the attic.

Laura Bentley


Japanese homes: while foraging in one of my piles of books, I found the book I knew was required - The Japanese Home Stylebook, Architectural Details and Motifs, illustrations (and yes, it's ILLUSTRATED, to the max - hundreds of perfect architectural renderings) by Saburo Yamagata. This is a fabulous book. It is a paperback, published by Stone Bridge Press ($18.95)  and it has wonderful scaled drawings of almost everything you could want if you are doing a traditional Japanese house - plans, interior elevations, shoji screens, tatami arrangements, windows and doors, railings and garden stuff.....  Worth every single cent, and many more.  I got it from Amazon, but I'm sure there are other ways.

Melissa


Murals: Who ever was looking for a source of murals, check out http://www.minigraphics.com/.

Nursemini


Turned Toothpicks:   I have cut off the turned part, painted it gold, and used it for a faux hinge and oriental drawer pull. I have similarly used that portion for a turned detail on the front of a handcrafted washstand. I use them for 1/4 scale chairs and four poster and canopy beds. Have also used them as spindles.

Linda in Leroy, OH


Victorian door bells: I wrote to a Victorian Architectural group and asked if they could tell me where Victorian Door Bells were located and this is the answer I recvd:

-- vintrest {vintrest1@msn.com} wrote: Victorian doorbells come in several configurations. The two most common are the twist-type and the pull- lever type. The pull types seem to be slightly older,(1860's-1890) but that is just based on my experience, not on documented proof. The twist type(like she described) seem to be more common from about 1880 and later only to be replaced increasingly by the electric doorbell in the 1890's.

As for placement, the most common locations are on the door framing- to the right of the door (like on my home)or, in the middle of the center panel of a door, below the glass, if the door had glass. The height also seems to be a bit lower than we are accustomed to today so that a young child could reach the doorbell, about 36" from the bottom of the door or less. Hope this will help. John "

Sherry in Arlington, TX


Siding: If at all possible, the best way to glue siding to your walls is before the house is put together, using lots of books to weight it down. (An encyclopedia on CD is handy, but not worth much in the weight department!) Putting up the siding after the house is constructed calls for LOTS of masking tape and clamps. Still very difficult to keep the bottom edge of each piece from popping up.

Dani in Bradshaw MD


Shingles: When I put on shingles, I mark the roof 3/4 inch from the bottom and then every full inch beyond that. I line up shingles along a straight edge and put a strip of masking tape over the row. This is a great job for the grandchildren, when they want to "help". In truth, having a second person to keep feeding you strips of shingles is a real blessing. Anyway, run a line of hot glue about a quarter inch below the pencil mark, and lay the entire row of shingles in one "swell foop", as my eldest called it.

The secret to a permanent roofing job is not to use low-melt glue; it will harden before you get to the end of the row, and will soften in the sunshine. I used regular hot-melt on all my buildings and haven't lost more than one or two shingles.

Dani in Bradshaw MD


Shingles: When I put on shingles, I mark the roof 3/4 inch from the bottom and then every full inch beyond that. I line up shingles along a straight edge and put a strip of masking tape over the row. This is a great job for the grandchildren, when they want to "help". In truth, having a second person to keep feeding you strips of shingles is a real blessing. Anyway, run a line of hot glue about a quarter inch below the pencil mark, and lay the entire row of shingles in one "swell foop", as my eldest called it.

The secret to a permanent roofing job is not to use low-melt glue; it will harden before you get to the end of the row, and will soften in the sunshine. I used regular hot-melt on all my buildings and haven't lost more than one or two shingles.

Dani in Bradshaw MD


Hagatha's House:    I have noticed the people asking that the answers to questions be posted on the digest and not mailed directly to the asker.   I asked about Hagatha's insides and roof.   On the inside, most people thought I should have hand-hewn beams with stucco or stonework inside.   I did this and it does look great, the walls are a light tan stucco with the beams dark brown,  The floors are planks, also dark brown.  The fireplace and outside walls are gray stonework stippled with black, green and brown.   Son Alex says it looks mossy on the outside now.    On the roof, I had thatch suggested the most, with sod being the second suggestion.  One reader kindly offered to send me broom straw from Georgia, which I will be very grateful for and will send some handmade roses in a florist box in swap.   Also, Another reader sent me a link to a thatching site, that showed how to do it!  More gratefulness!  I will try thatching.. what is the worst thing that can happen?  I might have to rip it off and start over.. oh, well, I've done that before!

In any case, I agree, send the answers to the digest as I really like reading the hints others give others too!  

Eileen in St. Louis


Log Cabin:   A couple of years ago my brother in law made log cabins for my sister and I..Hers was finished with Min Wax stain and polyurethane, with very neat rows of chinking between the logs...looks like one of the new log homes in the magazines...

Mine was coated with Thomas's Bug Juice to give it that old grey look and sort of pushed in chinking to make it look like it had been sitting in the woods for ever.

We both used a wood filler from Home Depot...can't think of the brand...brown white and black label...we used white...it dries to a dull pale off white. If you have seen old log buildings with chinking still hanging in there the color is perfect..Sometimes you just luck out. Both of them are great if I do say so myself and a little praise for my baby sister...You wouldn't believe to look at them now that they had started out identical.

Annamarie, Stuart, Florida


Gutters and Rainwater pipes:  I came across this site by chance.  I hope it is of use.   They have a great range of items. JSM Miniatures Specialists in 1/12 scale Rainwater Fittings for Doll's Houses. http://www.jsm-miniatures.com

Evelyn


URL for old New York City goodies: An interesting site to visit for good examples of old signage, cobblestone streets, lamp posts and so much more. And interesting to see how varied New York City really is. http://www.forgotten-ny.com

Pat in SC


Dulling a Shiny Finish: Delores asked about how to reduce the bothersome glare found on heavily coated furniture. One thing that might be attempted if you have some spare time, is to gently hand-rub the pieces with some very fine ( 0000 ) steel wool. You don't need to remove the finish, just evenly scratch it, so that the top coat can adhere to the surface


Ceiling idea: Working away diligently on the cigar shop. Wanted it to have a Victorian look. For the ceiling, I took a large paper doily and affixed it to poster board with rubber contact cement. When dry and zapped with several coats of white spray paint it looks really cool. Looks like one of those pressed tin type ceilings and the scale is just right.

Linda in Leroy, OH


Finishing Order: I do ceilings, floor, then walls.   But it's pretty much up to you.  You can also make windows by just putting stripwood trim on the outside and inside(after inside walls are finished) and sandwich Plexiglas in between.   I still think real windows are the best and you could maybe buy them one at a time.  But the other way will work.

Fannye in TX


This category has 307 tips of 10312 tips in the archives.

Previous 20 | Next 20


Page 3 of 16.



Search for:


Browse the database (all entries)